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William Shenstone Quotes

English poet and gardener (b. 1714), Death: 11-2-1763 William Shenstone Quotes
1.
A liar begins with making falsehood appear like truth, and ends with making truth itself appear like falsehood.
William Shenstone

2.
The proper means of increasing the love we bear our native country is to reside some time in a foreign one.
William Shenstone

3.
Deference is the most complicate, the most indirect, and the most elegant of all compliments.
William Shenstone

4.
Jealousy is the fear or apprehension of superiority: envy our uneasiness under it.
William Shenstone

5.
Hope is a flatterer, but the most upright of all parasites; for she frequents the poor man's hut, as well as the palace of his superior.
William Shenstone

Similar Authors: Ralph Waldo Emerson William Shakespeare C. S. Lewis Rumi Samuel Johnson George Herbert George Eliot Maya Angelou Horace Charles Bukowski John Milton Alexander Pope Ovid Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Sylvia Plath
6.
A statue in a garden is to be considered as one part of a scene or landscape.
William Shenstone

7.
We may daily discover crowds acquire sufficient wealth to buy gentility, but very few that possess the virtues which ennoble human nature, and (in the best sense of the word) constitute a gentleman.
William Shenstone

8.
Virtues, like essences, lose their fragrance when exposed.
William Shenstone

Quote Topics by William Shenstone: Men People Mean Writing Garden Character Fool Littles Life Tree Expenses Honesty Taste Eye May Envy Giving Anger Fashion Essence Perfect Style Reason London Lying Learning Infinite Art Wit Thinking
9.
The difference there is betwixt honor and honesty seems to be chiefly the motive; the mere honest man does that from duty which the man of honor does for the sake of character.
William Shenstone

10.
The world may be divided into people that read, people that write, people that think, and fox-hunters.
William Shenstone

11.
Laws are generally found to be nets of such a texture, as the little creep through, the great break through, and the middle-sized are alone entangled in it.
William Shenstone

12.
Anger is a great force. If you control it, it can be transmuted into a power which can move the whole world.
William Shenstone

13.
A miser grows rich by seeming poor. An extravagant man grows poor by seeming rich.
William Shenstone

14.
Flattery of the verbal kind is gross. In short, applause is of too coarse a nature to be swallowed in the gross, though the extract or tincture be ever so agreeable.
William Shenstone

15.
Zealous men are ever displaying to you the strength of their belief. while judicious men are showing you the grounds of it.
William Shenstone

16.
Grandeur and beauty are so very opposite, that you often diminish the one as you increase the other. Variety is most akin to the latter, simplicity to the former.
William Shenstone

17.
A fool and his words are soon parted.
William Shenstone

18.
Theirs is the present who can praise the past.
William Shenstone

19.
Prudent men lock up their motives, letting familiars have a key to their hearts, as to their garden.
William Shenstone

20.
What leads to unhappiness is making pleasure the chief aim.
William Shenstone

21.
The weak and insipid white wine makes at length excellent vinegar.
William Shenstone

22.
To one who said, "I do not believe that there is an honest man in the world," another replied, "It is impossible that any one man should know all the world, but quite possible that one may know himself."
William Shenstone

23.
The eye must be easy, before it can be pleased.
William Shenstone

24.
Patience is the panacea; but where does it grow, or who can swallow it?
William Shenstone

25.
Poetry and consumption are the most flattering of diseases.
William Shenstone

26.
Modesty makes large amends for the pain it gives those who labor under it, by the prejudice it affords every worthy person in their favor.
William Shenstone

27.
A large retinue upon a small income, like a large cascade upon a small stream, tends to discover its tenuity.
William Shenstone

28.
A man has generally the good or ill qualities which he attributes to mankind.
William Shenstone

29.
So sweetly she bade me adieu, I thought that she bade me return.
William Shenstone

30.
Long sentences in a short composition are like large rooms in a little house.
William Shenstone

31.
Health is beauty, and the most perfect health is the most perfect beauty.
William Shenstone

32.
I have been formerly so silly as to hope that every servant I had might be made a friend; I am now convinced that the nature of servitude generally bears a contrary tendency. People's characters are to be chiefly collected from their education and place in life; birth itself does but little.
William Shenstone

33.
Love can be founded upon Nature only.
William Shenstone

34.
Learning, like money, may be of so base a coin as to be utterly void of use; or, if sterling, may require good management to make it serve the purposes of sense or happiness.
William Shenstone

35.
A person that would secure to himself great deference will, perhaps, gain his point by silence as effectually as by anything he can say.
William Shenstone

36.
Men are sometimes accused of pride, merely because their accusers would be proud themselves were they in their places.
William Shenstone

37.
Taste is pursued at a less expense than fashion.
William Shenstone

38.
The best time to frame an answer to the letters of a friend, is the moment you receive them. Then the warmth of friendship, and the intelligence received, most forcibly cooperate.
William Shenstone

39.
It should seem that indolence itself would incline a person to be honest, as it requires infinitely greater pains and contrivance to be a knave.
William Shenstone

40.
A wound in the friendship of young persons, as in the bark of young trees, may be so grown over as to leave no scar. The case is very different in regard to old persons and old timber. The reason of this may be accountable from the decline of the social passions, and the prevalence of spleen, suspicion, and rancor towards the latter part of life.
William Shenstone

41.
Misers, as death approaches, are heaping up a chest of reasons to stand in more awe of him.
William Shenstone

42.
Persons are oftentimes misled in regard to their choice of dress by attending to the beauty of colors, rather than selecting such colors as may increase their own beauty.
William Shenstone

43.
Many persons, when exalted, assume an insolent humility, who behaved before with an insolent haughtiness.
William Shenstone

44.
Deference often shrinks and withers as much upon the approach of intimacy as the sensitive plant does upon the touch of one's finger.
William Shenstone

45.
The love of popularity seems little else than the love of being beloved; and is only blamable when a person aims at the affections of a people by means in appearance honest, but in their end pernicious and destructive.
William Shenstone

46.
Let us be careful to distinguish modesty, which is ever amiable, from reserve, which is only prudent.
William Shenstone

47.
In a heavy oppressive atmosphere, when the spirits sink too low, the best cordial is to read over all the letters of one's friends.
William Shenstone

48.
I trimmed my lamp, consumed the midnight oil.
William Shenstone

49.
Learning, like money, may be of so base a coin as to be utterly void of use.
William Shenstone

50.
Critics must excuse me if I compare them to certain animals called asses, who, by gnawing vines, originally taught the great advantage of pruning them.
William Shenstone