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D. H. Lawrence Quotes

English novelist, Birth: 11-9-1885, Death: 2-3-1930 D. H. Lawrence Quotes
1.
Those that go searching for love only make manifest their own lovelessness, and the loveless never find love, only the loving find love, and they never have to seek for it.
D. H. Lawrence

2.
When van Gogh paints sunflowers, he reveals, or achieves, the vivid relation between himself, as man, and the sunflower, as sunflower, at that quick moment of time. His painting does not represent the sunflower itself. We shall never know what the sunflower itself is. And the camera will visualize the sunflower far more perfectly than van Gogh can.
D. H. Lawrence

3.
Europe's the mayonnaise all right, but America supplies the good old lobster.
D. H. Lawrence

4.
Beauty is an experience, nothing else. It is not a fixed pattern or an arrangement of features. It is something felt, a glow or a communicated sense of fineness.
D. H. Lawrence

5.
Perhaps only people who are capable of real togetherness have that look of being alone in the universe. The others have a certain stickiness, they stick to the mass.
D. H. Lawrence

Similar Authors: Mark Twain C. S. Lewis Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Haruki Murakami Ayn Rand Charles Dickens George Eliot Albert Camus Kurt Vonnegut Victor Hugo Chuck Palahniuk Margaret Atwood Virginia Woolf Ernest Hemingway George R. R. Martin
6.
The Moon! Artemis! the great goddess of the splendid past of men! Are you going to tell me she is a dead lump?
D. H. Lawrence

7.
We've got to live, no matter how many skies have fallen.
D. H. Lawrence

8.
The Aztec gods and goddesses are, as far as we have known anything about them, an unlovely and unlovable lot. In their myths there is no grace or charm, no poetry. Only this perpetual grudge, grudge, grudging, one god grudging another, the gods grudging men their existence, and men grudging the animals. The goddess of love is goddess of dirt and prostitution, a dirt-eater, a horror, without a touch of tenderness.
D. H. Lawrence

Quote Topics by D. H. Lawrence: Men Literature Love Sex Soul Life Self Real Art People Believe Passion Long Dark Fall Flower Hate Book Heart Sea Children Blood Thinking Sleep Body Lying Women America Eye World
9.
No creature is fully itself till it is, like the dandelion, opened in the bloom of pure relationship to the sun, the entire living cosmos.
D. H. Lawrence

10.
The deadly Hydra now is the hydra of Equality. Liberty, Equality and Fraternity is the three-fanged serpent.
D. H. Lawrence

11.
Ethics and equity and the principles of justice do not change with the calendar.
D. H. Lawrence

12.
Money poisons you when you've got it, and starves you when you haven't.
D. H. Lawrence

13.
I don't like your miserable lonely single front name. It is so limited, so meager; it has no versatility; it is weighted down with the sense of responsibility; it is worn threadbare with much use; it is as bad as having only one jacket and one hat; it is like having only one relation, one blood relation, in the world. Never set a child afloat on the flat sea of life with only one sail to catch the wind.
D. H. Lawrence

14.
Brute force crushes many plants. Yet the plants rise again. The Pyramids will not last a moment compared with the daisy. And before Buddha or Jesus spoke the nightingale sang, and long after the words of Jesus and Buddha are gone into oblivion the nightingale still will sing. Because it is neither preaching nor commanding nor urging. It is just singing. And in the beginning it was not a Word, but a chirrup.
D. H. Lawrence

15.
Ours is essentially a tragic age, so we refuse to take it tragically. The cataclysm has happened, we are among the ruins, we start to build up new little habitats, to have new little hopes. It is rather hard work: there is now no smooth road into the future: but we go round, or scramble over the obstacles. We’ve got to live, no matter how many skies have fallen.
D. H. Lawrence

16.
Behold then Septimus Dodge returning to Dodge-town victorious. Not crowned with laurel, it is true, but wreathed in lists of things he has seen and sucked dry. Seen and sucked dry, you know: Venus de Milo, the Rhine or the Coliseum: swallowed like so many clams, and left the shells.
D. H. Lawrence

17.
Curse the blasted, jelly-boned swines, the slimy, the belly-wriggling invertebrates, the miserable soddingrotters, the flaming sods, the sniveling, dribbling, dithering, palsied, pulse-less lot that make up England today. They've got white of egg in their veins, and their spunk is that watery it's a marvel they can breed.
D. H. Lawrence

18.
Life is ours to be spent, not to be saved.
D. H. Lawrence

19.
Love is the flower of life, and blossoms unexpectedly and without law, and must be plucked where it is found, and enjoyed for the brief hour of its duration.
D. H. Lawrence

20.
Oh literature, oh the glorious Art, how it preys upon the marrow in our bones. It scoops the stuffing out of us, and chucks us aside. Alas!
D. H. Lawrence

21.
An artist is only an ordinary man with a greater potentiality.
D. H. Lawrence

22.
One sheds one's sicknesses in books - repeats and presents again one's emotions, to be master of them.
D. H. Lawrence

23.
Men fight for liberty and win it with hard knocks. Their children, brought up easy, let it slip away again, poor fools. And their grandchildren are once more slaves.
D. H. Lawrence

24.
Every civilization when it loses its inner vision and its cleaner energy, falls into a new sort of sordidness, more vast and more stupendous than the old savage sort. An Augean stable of metallic filth.
D. H. Lawrence

25.
no form of love is wrong, so long as it is love, and you yourself honour what you are doing. Love has an extraordinary variety of forms! And that is all there is in life, it seems to me. But I grant you, if you deny the variety of love you deny love altogether. If you try to specialize love into one set of accepted feelings, you wound the very soul of love. Love must be multi-form, else it is just tyranny, just death
D. H. Lawrence

26.
Human love, human trust, are always perilous, because they break down. The greater the love, the greater the trust, and the greater the peril, the greater the disaster. Because to place absolute trust on another human being is in itself a disaster, both ways, since each human being is a ship that must sail its own course, even if it go in company with another ship.... And yet, love is the greatest thing between human beings.
D. H. Lawrence

27.
My God, what a clumsy olla putrida James Joyce is! Nothing but old fags and cabbage stumps of quotations from the Bible and the rest, stewed in the juice of deliberate, journalistic dirty-mindedness—what old and hard-worked staleness, masquerading as the all-new!
D. H. Lawrence

28.
Sunday night meant, in the dark, wintry, rainy Midlands ... anywhere where two creatures might stand and squeeze together and spoon.... Spooning was a fine art, whereas kissing and cuddling are calf-processes.
D. H. Lawrence

29.
A snake came to my water trough On a hot, hot day, and I in pajamas for the heat, To drink there.
D. H. Lawrence

30.
There is only one thing that a man really wants to do, all his life; and that is, to find his way to his God, his Morning Star, salute his fellow man, and enjoy the woman who has come the long way with him.
D. H. Lawrence

31.
Beauty is a mystery. You can neither eat it nor make flannel out of it.
D. H. Lawrence

32.
But that is how men are! Ungrateful and never satisfied. When you don't have them they hate you because you won't; and when you do have them they hate you again, for some other reason. Or for no reason at all, except that they are discontented children, and can't be satisfied whatever they get, let a woman do what she may.
D. H. Lawrence

33.
Never set a child afloat on the flat sea of life with only one sail to catch the wind.
D. H. Lawrence

34.
It always seemed to me that men wore their beards, like they wear their neckties, for show.
D. H. Lawrence

35.
Consciousness is an end in itself. We torture ourselves getting somewhere, and when we get there it is nowhere, for there is nowhere to get to.
D. H. Lawrence

36.
Be still when you have nothing to say; when genuine passion moves you, say what you've got to say, and say it hot.
D. H. Lawrence

37.
In every living thing there is the desire for love.
D. H. Lawrence

38.
Oh, what a catastrophe, what a maiming of love when it was made personal, merely personal feeling. This is what is the matter with us: we are bleeding at the roots because we are cut off from the earth and sun and stars. Love has become a grinning mockery because, poor blossom, we plucked it from its stem on the Tree of Life and expected it to keep on blooming in our civilized vase on the table.
D. H. Lawrence

39.
The living moment is everything.
D. H. Lawrence

40.
We ought to dance with rapture that we should be alive and in the flesh, and part of the living, incarnate cosmos.
D. H. Lawrence

41.
Only the desert has a fascination--to ride alone--in the sun in the forever unpossessed country--away from man. That is a great temptation.
D. H. Lawrence

42.
In masturbation there is nothing but loss. There is no reciprocity. There is merely the spending away of a certain force, and no return. The body remains, in a sense, a corpse, after the act of self-abuse. There is no change, only deadening. There is what we call dead loss. And this is not the case in any act of sexual intercourse between two people. Two people may destroy one another in sex. But they cannot just produce the null effect of masturbation.
D. H. Lawrence

43.
What sex is, we don't know, but it must be some sort of fire. For it always communicates a sense of warmth, of glow. And when this glow becomes a pure shine, then we feel the sense of beauty. We all have the fire of sex slumbering or burning inside us. If we live to be ninety, it is still there. Or, if it dies, we become one of those ghastly living corpses which are unfortunately becoming more numerous in the world.
D. H. Lawrence

44.
Man has little needs and deeper needs. We have fallen into the mistake of living from our little needs till we have almost lost our deeper needs in a sort of madness.
D. H. Lawrence

45.
There's always the hyena of morality at the garden gate, and the real wolf at the end of the street.
D. H. Lawrence

46.
The tragedy is when you've got sex in the head instead of down where it belongs.
D. H. Lawrence

47.
Do come back and draw the ferrets, they are the most lovely noble darlings in the world.
D. H. Lawrence

48.
Love is the hastening gravitation of spirit towards spirit, and body towards body, in the joy of creation.
D. H. Lawrence

49.
We don't exist unless we are deeply and sensually in touch with that which can be touched but not known.
D. H. Lawrence

50.
Eat and carouse with Bacchus, or munch dry bread with Jesus, but don't sit down without one of the gods.
D. H. Lawrence